NATA Members Help Shape Debates in 2017, Build Strong Foundation for 2018

January 4, 2018

By Bill Deere, Executive Vice President of Government and External Affairs

This time last year, I warned that 2017 could be a wild one for the aviation business community. That turned out be a vast understatement. From proposals to corporatize air traffic control to price regulation of FBOs, this past year has been a constant challenge to the association and its members. As we head into the new year, challenges will remain but we are also hopeful that the work begun this year may result in significant progress in 2018.

No doubt the biggest debate in aviation in 2017 was the airline industry proposal to privatize the nation’s air traffic control system, an idea that was embraced by both the Trump Administration and the Chairman of the House Transportation Committee, Representative Bill Shuster (R-PA). Ultimately, the proposal was incorporated into the House version of the FAA reauthorization, H.R. 2997, the 21st Century AIRR Act. Following committee approval, it looked like the legislation was headed to the floor of the House of Representatives for a vote.

That is where the proposal met with the collective resistance of NATA and the rest of the general aviation community. NATA’s hundreds of Hill meetings, combined with the grassroots support of our members and countless others, were enough to introduce uncertainty in the House Republican leadership as to whether the corporatization proposal would survive a House floor vote. For that reason, the current FAA authorization was extended until March 30, 2018.

Significantly, the Senate FAA legislation contains no corporatization proposal. NATA members who participated in our annual Congressional Fly-In were the last general aviation group to visit the Senate before the bill was drafted and your direct advocacy efforts in opposition to corporatization benefited the entire general aviation community.

For 2018, you can expect the ATC corporatization battle to be fought one more time. At this writing, Congress is focused elsewhere, tax legislation, year-end spending bills, and immigration to name just a few issues. But as the calendar turns, and the next FAA authorization deadline approaches, you can expect our deep-pocketed opponents to make one more attempt to wrest control of the air traffic control system and turn it over to the airlines. We ask you to stand ready and be prepared to weigh in with your elected representatives. You are the aviation business community’s best voice.

While we expected the ATC corporatization battle, in 2017 we unexpectedly found ourselves in a debate with a national pilot organization that suggested to the FAA that FBOs are akin to public utilities and should be regulated along similar lines. This was a moment where our members were critical to our efforts to shape the debate. Thanks to the help of member companies, FBOs and Part 135 companies alike, we developed a report on the state of the FBO industry. The report, which is available on the front page of our website, is a comprehensive look at the industry and the many factors that impact the pricing of FBO services.

I am pleased that as 2017 progressed, more and more industry leaders turned to our report as the foundation for debate. It has also been gratifying to see the thoughtful approaches that have been taken to the issue by other groups, including the Experimental Aircraft Association, which featured an excellent article on the subject in its May edition of Sport Aviation.

So where do we go from here? As you will see in the article on our annual leadership conference (page 51), your association met the issue head-on with a panel that included pilots, FBOs, airports and fuelers. A dialogue started there that I hope will continue into 2018.

Finally, I don’t want to leave you with the idea that all we do at NATA is try and beat back bad ideas. We take seriously our responsibility to advance a positive, member-driven industry agenda. There are proposals in Congress and before the agencies across a range of issues, including taxes, addressing illegal charter, air carrier training and others that we hope to see implemented in 2018.

As we reflect on 2017 and look ahead to 2018, one thing is clearer than ever. We are in it together. To advance big ideas or defeat major threats, is a job that requires all of us to be engaged.

Republished from the 2017 Q4 Aviation Business Journal.


2016 Aviation Business Conference | Gathering in Washington During Interesting Times

June 20, 2016

NATA members attending the association’s second annual Aviation Business Conference are arriving in Washington, D.C. at an interesting time. Congress will still be in session but can already see on its horizon July 15th, the date it will adjourn for the two national political conventions and its annual summer recess. Returning shortly after Labor Day, Congress will meet for only a few short weeks before adjourning to campaign in advance of the November 8th general election.

Not by coincidence, July 15th is also the date of the expiration of the FAA’s current authorization. On the House side, Chairman Shuster’s (R-PA) proposal to create an air traffic corporation continues to languish due to objections from other congressional committees, conservative Republicans, and virtually the entire House Democratic Caucus. NATA continues to voice its strong objections to the corporation concept at any and all venues that provide us the opportunity to discuss the dangers it poses to general aviation. Like presidential candidates, NATA has been on the road, updating the aviation business community in Florida, Wisconsin, Illinois, South Carolina, Indiana and Texas on the status of the Shuster proposal. We also continue to work the issue at the national level, educating the press and appearing at public policy forums here in Washington, D.C., to rebut the outrageous claims of the airline interests campaigning for ATC corporatization.

I am also pleased to report that in April the United States Senate took a different, more hopeful path than the House, approving by a vote of 95-3 a bipartisan FAA bill that does not include provisions to create an ATC corporation. The legislation instead embraces NATA’s long-stated belief that Congress should build upon its previous work and continue to improve the consistency of FAA decisions across its offices and regions, streamline the FAA certification process to better reflect today’s pace of innovation, and assist the agency in operating as efficiently as possible.

The Senate’s action now puts the impetus for further action in the hands of House Transportation Committee Chairman Shuster to decide whether or not to continue to press forward on his proposal to create a user fee-funded, air traffic control corporation, accept the Senate proposal, or simply extend the FAA’s authorization beyond its current expiration on July 15th. Senator John Thune (R-SD), Chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, who steered the legislation through the Senate, has publically expressed his hope there will be no more extensions and that the House will give serious consideration to the bipartisan approach taken by the Senate.

This puts NATA members in Washington, D.C. this June smack dab in the middle of it all. Our annual fly-in on June 9th will once again feature key aviation policymakers sharing their perspectives on the FAA reauthorization debate. We are also fortunate that once again Tom Hendricks and the leaders of the other general aviation associations will brief you in advance of your trip to the Capitol Building. And, of course, we will also gather informally that evening on Capitol Hill with aviation policymakers and their staffs for our annual industry reception.

However, the Aviation Business Conference is more than about politics. For that reason, we will be joined by TSA Administrator Peter Neffenger, who will discuss the security challenges facing our nation. FAA Associate Administrator for Aviation Safety Peggy Gilligan will be on hand to answer your questions about the FAA’s regulatory agenda. Finally, the conference will be packed with sessions providing insights on the state of the industry and the latest in effective business and safety practices.

So bring some good walking shoes (we can never guarantee the operating state of our subway), your questions and your insights. We look forward to seeing you in our nation’s capital!

By Bill Deere, Senior Vice President for Government and External Affairs (republished from Q2 2016 Aviation Business Journal)